Fiction–The G-Rated “F-Word,” Part 2.

Gathered around The Writers’ Table last week we discussed two unique features found exclusively in Fiction and not in nonfiction. Feelings are central for the Writer and the Reader. Meanwhile the author’s adherence to authentic Facts(which we’ll discuss at length later on) remains every bit as important. No matter the genre, there’s nothing like the appeal of a well-written, enduring novel that offers entertainment with painless education on the side. The ideal reading experience is “curling up with a good novel,” not the latest How-to or Self-Help book.

Here are several more “F-words” that distinguish Fiction from its distant relative, nonfiction. 

F is for Fun: Not all Fiction is Fun, but most is. If it’s fun to write, then it’s usually enjoyable for the Reader too. Although there is intense work represented by the simplest story, all Writers find pleasure in their work. If we don’t find pleasure, it shows through. At present, certain “Big Name Authors” have ceased to write their own stories, relying on a name alone to sell their books. Maybe they’re not enjoying the writing process anymore. The astute Reader can always tell.                    

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The Wonderful Art of Fiction–the G-Rated “F-Word,” Part 1

In this new series of blog posts we’ll use the acronym F-I-C-T-I-O-N to help Readers and Writers view the traditionally accepted role of fiction in a new light. No matter the genre, there’s nothing like the appeal of a well-written, enduring novel that offers good entertainment with painless education on the side. The ideal reading experience is “curling up with a good novel,” not the latest How-to or Self-Help book.

Let’s examine the passion and aliveness that distinguishes fiction from so-called nonfiction. One Writer once described fiction as “real life with all the dull parts left out.” That’s a good beginning, but there’s even more to it.

F is for Feeling. For those of us with even one year of high school journalism, one dictum was drilled into our heads: “You must not allow feelings or opinions to intrude in your writing.” Unless you were lucky enough to write editorials, now known as Op-Eds in many periodicals, or even feature stories, your writing was deliberately sterile and devoid of feeling. Most nonfiction remains that way.

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Writing is All About Reading

Writing is all about Reading: My blog title should make sense and stand by itself, yet I’m sure that in the minds of many it does not. I’m proud to be an author and to claim many other authors as colleagues, but all of us were first and foremost voracious Readers. Furthermore, none of our writings—mine or that of my friends or even the Greats of all Time—would have existed beyond the moment of pen-to-paper had it not been for Readers.

My next several weeks of blog posts are directed to both Readers and Writers of Fiction. You Readers of nonfiction should stay tuned as well. Anything that we enjoy, we enjoy even more if we understand how and why it reaches us and touches us. Why does a certain kind writing have compelling power? Why do others not?

Readers and Writers are in this together. For Readers, you’ll enjoy understanding better why you like to read certain authors and genres as well as why you don’t like others. If you’re in a book club, you may find inspiration for stimulating discussions. As a bonus for Writers, you’ll learn how to reach those with the same passions that you write about….

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